Monday, February 16, 2009

Batato alambe song (Potato & Mushroom side dish)

Many are unaware that mushrooms are highly nutritious, delicious, and low in calories and excellent weight watchers. In the West; the mushroom industry is a multi million dollar industry. They are a healthy addition to any meal. While some mushrooms make excellent dishes in their own right, some are suitable for flavoring such things as soups and stews. Mushroom can be added to enhance the food value and in a variety of culinary delights.
The nutritional value of mushrooms as sugar free, protein rich food supplement is well known. Mushrooms are grouped with vegetables, yet provide the proteins found in meats. The edible mushrooms are high in antioxidants which help in disease prevention. Most importantly, mushrooms are fat and cholesterol free, low in sodium, yet provide several vitamins, minerals and amino acids which act as building blocks of proteins, in the form of riboflavin, selenium and niacin. Mushrooms are the only vegetables with vitamin D, essential for bone and teeth development. The copper content plays a crucial role in the manufacture of red blood cells, which acts as an oxygen carrier. Potassium controls the blood pressure and prevents stroke and selenium boosts the immune system.
The use of mushrooms as food has a long and varied history. These edible fungi have been used as food ever since the hunting and gathering stage of our prehistoric ancestors. The credit of popularizing mushrooms goes to the Greeks and Romans who mastered the art of exploiting the culinary benefits of mushroom fungi in preparing varied exotic dishes. A particular species of mushroom called boletaria was so highly prized by the Romans that certain cooking pots were set aside and reserved for its exclusive preparation. In the early days, scientific tools were not available to determine if wild species of mushrooms were poisonous or edible. Animals and slaves were used as guinea pigs to test the efficacy of newly discovered forest mushrooms which is called Gud Gud Alambe in Konkani.


Wild edible mushrooms have interesting local names. These are derived from either the habitat (e.g., Roen olmi = termite hill mushroom/ satthe alambe), shape (Khut olme = mushroom with crutch, Fugo = balloon/ gud gud alambe)



MUSHROOM SELECTION: When buying mushrooms from the supermarket shelf, Choose those with a firm texture and even color with tightly-closed caps. If the gills are exposed, it's an indication of age, and they are probably past their prime. Discolored, broken and damaged mushrooms with soft spots should be avoided.





The Picture above is called satthe Alambe(satthe means umbrella), which grows in cool places like Madikeri, shimoga....




These Are the real gud gud alambe(thunder mushrooms) which grows when there is heavy thunder during rainy season. These taste yummy



Batato Alambe song:
Alambe is a Konkani word for mushrooms. A delicious side dish for dosa’s ,chapathis,and pej(ganji oota). Pan polo goes very good with ths.
Here is how its prepared:
Ingredents:
Potato -1
Fresh Mushrooms -7
Tomato -1
Onion -1
Coriander Leaves- few strands
Chilli Powder – 2tsp or according to one’s taste
Salt to taste
Oil as required
Method:
Heat oil add finely chopped onions. When pink add chopped tomatoes & mix until tomatoes r done.
Then add chilli powder, salt & mix until oil seperates.
Then add sliced mushrooms.
After a minute or 2 add peeled diced & boiled potatoes.
Keep on flame for 3 minutes. Add tamarind pulp & boil for 5 more minutes.
When done add finely chopped coriander leaves. Serve hot.






I m Sending this to Laxmi’s RCI Event hosted by Sia Of Monsoon Spice RCI-Udupi and Mangalore . Kodial/ Kudla/MangaloreRocks!!!!
RCI-Udupi & Mangalore
Signing of for now
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